Who we are.

The Irish Environmental Network is a network of individual environmental Non-Government Organisations (NGOs) that work individually and, as appropriate, jointly to protect and enhance the environment, and to place environmental issues centre stage in Ireland and internationally. The IEN works to promote the interlinked principles of environmental, social and economic sustainability. In representing the environment its Members represent a common good and not self interest. As a network, IEN is greater than the sum of its parts, with synergies developing from working together and sharing knowledge, skills, strengths and experience. The Network acts on behalf of its Members to secure core and other funding for their activities.

What we do

The Irish Environmental Network represents to government the capacity building and funding needs of its member organisations, all of whom are involved in one way or another in the well-being, protection and enhancement of the environment. All these individual organisations attempt to achieve these aims through:

Conservation Work

Many of our members have a core mission to protect and preserve Ireland’s natural environment. Through funding and initiatives such as Biodiversity Week we help them in that mission.

Raising public awareness and education

Our members work to build better understanding of environmental issues. Through special outreach schemes, such as Green Schools, our members work to educate young people on the impact of consumption and environmental harm.

Advocacy

Our groups campaign and lobby to change environmental policy at local, national and European level. The IEN helps groups to come together and campaign collectively on issues. The best example of this is the advocacy coalition the Environmental Pillar which is made up of 28 national environmental NGOs. The Environmental Pillar campaigns on a number of environmental policy areas including: climate change, resource efficiency, tree cover, the marine and agriculture.

How we work

1 The IEN supports its members by distributing core funding to member groups annually. These funds come through the Department of the Environment, Community and Local Government. Groups apply for funding and their application is reviewed by independent assessors and the funding distributed accordingly.


2 The IEN offers training and support to members particularly in the areas of communication, fundraising, and governance. Media training is provided to groups on a quarterly basis. Special training programmes have also been arranged. For example with the implementation of the Charities Act special training has also been offered to environmental groups in the area of governance.


3 The IEN provides funding to environmental groups to attend international NGO conferences and intergovernmental meetings. Funding is also provided for the preparation of submissions to national plans or policies. These funding lines give environmental groups the extra capacity needed to have an impact on important policy decisions in Ireland and internationally.